LITERARY NERD

Sep 19

[video]

[video]

Sep 18

[video]

[video]

(Source: tilly3200, via therevenclawbibliophile)

tmirai:

soundlyawake:

melissaannandthecool:

Just a reminder

wait…that’s…real?

Yep. A real thing. And one of their reasons was, essentially, because they don’t want employers -not- hiring women because they fear lawsuits from not paying them fair wages.
Can’t make that up.

tmirai:

soundlyawake:

melissaannandthecool:

Just a reminder

wait…that’s…real?

Yep. A real thing. And one of their reasons was, essentially, because they don’t want employers -not- hiring women because they fear lawsuits from not paying them fair wages.

Can’t make that up.

(via finishthepagefootnotes)

[video]

[video]

Sep 17


An art installation of green plants growing on the wall of the building next to the CaixaForum Madrid — a modern art gallery — In Madrid, Spain. The living wall was created by french botanist Patrick Blanc

An art installation of green plants growing on the wall of the building next to the CaixaForum Madrid — a modern art gallery — In Madrid, Spain. The living wall was created by french botanist Patrick Blanc

(Source: malformalady, via wanderlustspirit)


This scene in Inglourious Bastards, this particular part, was so brilliantly written. The characters are playing a game where you sit in a circle and write a famous person’s name on a card, flip it over, pass the card to the person next to you and stick it to your head without looking. Then you ask everyone questions to figure out who it is. This man- a Nazi commander- asked “Am I American?” (no but..) “Have I visited America?” (yes) “Was my visit fruitious?” (no) “Did I go against my will?” (yes) “Am I from a place you’d call exotic?” (yes) “Am I from the jungle?” (yes) “Did I go by boat?” (yes) “And when I got there was I bound with chains and presented in front of a crowd?” (yes!) “Well then. I know who I am. An African slave. No? Oh then I’m King Kong.” — and in one instance the viewer realizes the metaphor which King Kong was to the African slave trade (a truly Tarantino way of inserting social awareness through dialogue spoken by social oppressors) as well as takes a moment of almost comic relief to a very strange middle ground since we see just how intelligent and foolproof this man is. This is good filmmaking. 

This scene in Inglourious Bastards, this particular part, was so brilliantly written. The characters are playing a game where you sit in a circle and write a famous person’s name on a card, flip it over, pass the card to the person next to you and stick it to your head without looking. Then you ask everyone questions to figure out who it is. This man- a Nazi commander- asked “Am I American?” (no but..) “Have I visited America?” (yes) “Was my visit fruitious?” (no) “Did I go against my will?” (yes) “Am I from a place you’d call exotic?” (yes) “Am I from the jungle?” (yes) “Did I go by boat?” (yes) “And when I got there was I bound with chains and presented in front of a crowd?” (yes!) “Well then. I know who I am. An African slave. No? Oh then I’m King Kong.” — and in one instance the viewer realizes the metaphor which King Kong was to the African slave trade (a truly Tarantino way of inserting social awareness through dialogue spoken by social oppressors) as well as takes a moment of almost comic relief to a very strange middle ground since we see just how intelligent and foolproof this man is. This is good filmmaking. 

(Source: silends, via lucilleluce)

[video]

faeriviera:


Once, in a online chat with fans, JK Rowling revealed that the third scent Hermione could smell emanating from the Amortentia was that of Ron Weasley’s hair. [ x ]

faeriviera:

Once, in a online chat with fans, JK Rowling revealed that the third scent Hermione could smell emanating from the Amortentia was that of Ron Weasley’s hair. [ x ]

image

(via aishareale)

Sep 16

[video]

(via danforth)